DockerCon 2017 - highlights & experiences

So, DockerCon! It turns out that building cool stuff gets you places. Back in 2016, I built a Docker Swarm from 5 Raspberry Pis by following Captain Alex Ellis’ tutorial and then went on to create two different visualisations for the swarm to demonstrate real time load balancing. This was picked up by Alex who got in touch soon after with the amazing news that Docker wanted to invite me to DockerCon17 in Austin, TX! I was incredibly excited about the prospect and asked if I would be able to give a talk showing some of the things I’ve done with Docker, so it was to my delight that they agreed. What is DockerCon like? DockerCon is the most continue...

My programming story... so far

Early days When I was 12, I was given a Raspberry Pi. For the first couple of days, it was really fun. After I had browsed the web for a while and played a bit of Minecraft, it sat in it's box for a few months. I really had no idea what to do with it. That was until I discovered that I could build a website with it. Wow, that was cool. I installed Apache and spent some time finding out where I needed to put the code. I started off getting to grips with HTML in nano (using inline styling, of course) until I realised I could write CSS in separate files and load them in. That was continue...

Drones, Zeros and Cake

We all love drones. We all love cake. And we all love Raspberry Pi. What better way to spend an afternoon than to kick up at my mate Ben's house, borrow his faster internet and combine all of those things. We started the day by wrapping a Pi Zero and camera module in excessive amounts of electrical tape and sticking it to Ben's 250-class racing drone. Sounds cool huh? Not only did it work amazingly well, it didn't impact the performance of the quad at all. Pretty good for a 1 GHz fully featured Linux box! As you can see from the image above, the camera module was orientated so as to get a birds eye view from the drone's continue...

The Pi-Powered Hamster Hunter Part 4: Reflections

Reflections At the end of our project our initial objectives had now been added to and matured through the development process. Objectives at the start The objective of this project was to build an all terrain vehicle which could be used for various applications and controlled from anywhere in the world. We wanted it to be operational in all circumstances, which meant being able to operate in low light/pitch dark conditions and being able to traverse all terrain. It was essential for the user to be able to see from the ReCoRVVA’s point of view in real time. We also wanted the ReCoRVVA to be able to sense when it was about to crash and automatically stop to continue...

The Pi-Powered Hamster Hunter Part 3: Putting it all together

Assembling the components The first prototypes we put together used an Arduino, and it was with these first prototypes that we had many problems with the motors. The first thing we tried was to run each motor from one of the Arduino’s digital pins. They were 5v motors, and the digital pins on the Arduino supplied 5v each, so we assumed the motors would run. We wrote then uploaded a simple drive script to the Arduino. However, the motors didn’t turn. We debugged the code and found no errors, we checked the pins were supplying voltage and yet the motors still didn’t turn. Eventually, we realised that there was a limit on the amount of current able continue...